Picture of the Statue of Liberty in New York .

America’s youngest concertmaster, David Coucheron, beamed, not as a glamor hero, but as a concentrated music worker. He shows us his wonderful craftsmanship in his glittering game – where he doesn’t have any desires to bear above others, but that operates as a “cool” magician – who with “his tricks” amazes and impresses with his masterful staccatti and flawless flagolettes and double grip. There are no signs of outside shows, no coquettish with “his art”, he is as a soloist the modest “primus interpares” (the foremost among peers).
The orchestra inspired it – and more than that – it sparkled in every respect.
Ari Rasileinen danced superbly in the tempo changes, peacock and percussion played from time to time more than they might have – but everyone obviously had great and genuine pleasure in playing with this wonderful soloist in this rare play.


Waxmann’s Carmen imagination was a new extension-the soloist listened here with a watchful ear for his fellow players ‘ initiative, and seemed totally effortless. Nothing seemed difficult or at the limit of his performance, all the most difficult virtuoso passages came precisely and effortlessly and the sensation between soloist and conductor was exciting, engaging and inspiring from beginning to end. All in all, a convincing conductor and a very well-prepared orchestra and a MASTER SOLIST.
What more could one want.

Published in SÜDKURIER